Georgia communities receive infrastructure loans totaling $61 million

August 25, 2015

ATLANTA – Six Georgia communities were awarded financing totaling $61,082,246 for water, sewer and wastewater infrastructure improvements by the Georgia Environmental Finance Authority (GEFA) board of directors.

The communities include the cities of Atlanta, Claxton, Colquitt, Louisville, Riceboro, and Wrightsville.

Approved Loans:

  • Atlanta was awarded a $51,426,136 Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) loan.
  • Claxton was awarded a $1,000,000 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) loan.
  • Colquitt was awarded a $201,110 Georgia Fund loan.
  • Louisville was awarded a $3,000,000 Georgia Fund loan.
  • Riceboro was awarded a $155,000 DWSRF loan.
  • Wrightsville was awarded a $5,300,000 CWSRF loan.

Quotes:

“The loan programs offered by GEFA assist local governments with improving their environmental infrastructure. Financing water, wastewater, solid waste, and energy, land and water conservation projects encourages economic growth and the stewardship of our environment.” – GEFA Executive Director Kevin Clark. 

“I’d like to express my appreciation to Gov. Deal, the Georgia Congressional delegation, and the members of the General Assembly for their support. The state’s commitment to helping cities and counties finance infrastructure projects contributes greatly to improving Georgia’s water resources.” – GEFA Executive Director Kevin Clark. 

“GEFA’s low-interest financing helps communities throughout the state. The projects that we agreed to finance today demonstrate that GEFA is investing in communities that are willing to invest in themselves.” – Chairman of the GEFA Board of Directors and Mayor of Dallas Boyd L. Austin.

Project and Loan Details:

City of Atlanta

The $51,426,136 CWSRF loan will finance improvements at the R.M. Clayton Water Reclamation Center headworks facility. The existing coarse screening and grit removal systems to treat raw influent will be replaced. New influent flow monitoring equipment will be installed to accurately measure and report the influent flows. The headworks facility receives influent flows from the combined stormwater and sanitary sewer collection systems via a deep rock pumping station, resulting in fluctuations in solids and flow rates. The existing mechanical screens, screening handling equipment and grit removal units aren’t functioning properly, and inadequate performance can impact the treatment process. The city will pay 2.03 percent interest on the 20-year loan.

City of Claxton

The $1,000,000 DWSRF loan will finance replacing water mains, adding loops, and renovating a well, which includes replacing the building, interior piping, pump, valves, chlorinators, and related appurtenances. This project will improve the water system’s reliability, help the city continue to supply quality potable water to its citizens, and conserve water. Claxton will pay 1.38 percent interest on the 20-year loan. This loan qualifies for an interest rate reduction because the water line repairs are a water conservation activity.

City of Colquitt

The $201,110 Georgia Fund loan will finance replacing the existing Drake sewage pump station with a submersible pump station adjacent to the existing pump station. The existing pump station has failed. The city is currently preventing sewage spills by using emergency pumps and lines to bypass the station. Colquitt will pay 3.03 percent interest on the 20-year loan. 

City of Louisville

The $3,000,000 Georgia Fund loan will finance purchasing and making upgrades to the existing Forstmann’s wastewater treatment facility, which will be connected to the Louisville sewer collection system. The project will help facilitate the construction of a new chicken processing facility in Louisville, and allow for additional treatment capacity within the city’s sewer collection system. The processing facility is slated to create 125 new jobs. Louisville will pay 3.03 percent interest on the 20-year loan.

City of Riceboro

The $155,000 DWSRF loan will finance replacing 407 residential water meters and 38 commercial water meters with automated meter reading water meters, including software and meter reading equipment. The project will ensure more accurate meter reading data, reducing revenue loss and water loss in the system. Riceboro will pay 0.50 percent interest on the 10-year loan. The loan qualifies for a reduced interest rate because it’s an eligible water conservation project.

City of Wrightsville

The $5,300,000 CWSRF loan will finance rehabilitating the city’s sewage collection system, which will include replacing pumps and electrical upgrades at five of the city’s pump stations. The project will reduce inflow and infiltration in the system, energy consumption and sanitary sewer overflows.

Wrightsville will pay 1.03 percent interest on the 20-year loan. This loan qualifies for an interest rate reduction because the inflow and infiltration reduction portion of the project is an energy conservation activity, and includes principal forgiveness of up to $500,000, if all loan funds are drawn.

Additional Information:

The CWSRF, a federal loan program administered by GEFA, provides communities throughout Georgia with low-interest loans to fund wastewater infrastructure and water pollution control projects. The program is jointly funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Georgia. Eligible projects include a variety of stormwater and wastewater collection and treatment projects. These projects conserve and improve water resources, and facilitate economic growth and development. Low-interest loans from this program are available up to $25 million.

The DWSRF, a federal loan program administered by GEFA, provides communities throughout Georgia with low-interest loans to fund water infrastructure projects that deliver safe, affordable drinking water. The program is jointly funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Georgia. Eligible projects include a wide variety of public health or compliance related water supply projects. These projects conserve and improve water resources, and facilitate economic growth and development. Low-interest loans from this program are available up to $25 million.

The Georgia Fund, a state-funded program administered by GEFA, provides communities with low-interest loans for water, wastewater, water conservation and solid waste infrastructure projects. Eligible projects include water and sewer lines, treatment plants, pumping stations, wells, water storage tanks and water meters. These projects conserve and improve water resources, and facilitate economic growth and development. Low-interest loans from this program are available up to $3 million.

GEFA provides loan financing at a reduced interest rate to local governments and authorities for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects at water and wastewater treatment plants, landfills, and municipal solid waste facilities, in addition to infrastructure improvements. Eligible projects include, but aren’t limited to: landfill gas reclamation; solar photovoltaic and thin film solar geo-membrane covers; wind and biomass; variable frequency drives and energy efficiency measures; energy management systems and controls; biogas heat and power recovery systems; and infiltration and inflow projects that reduce pumping costs.